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20130318
20130318
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president obama's view in terms of military engagement? we talk about syria a lot and there's some thinking, there's some wisdom out there that he doesn't want to get involved there because he understands what a quote-unquote quagmire it can be to get involved in a situation where there is no clear end point. >> well i think first of all, he's the commander-in-chief because of that decision. we, we forget because by the time we came into office in 2009, it was all about the economy. but the animating event really for three years, leading up to that election, was iraq. i definitely think, i think it is, i think it will have a huge impact, it has on this commander-in-chief and will have on future commanders in chief. because they understand that without some popular support, it's hard to go about doing -- a lot of military action. without some broad popular support among people to do something like this, there's very little taste to park tens of thousands of people in a place like syria. that even though it's important, has less of a connection to folks here at home. they understand now proba
you. >> my pleasure. >> ifill: later this week, president obama travels to israel, the west bank and jordan. iran, syria, and reviving the middle east peace process will be high on the agenda. the president faces challenges bridging differences between israelis and palestinians, and fractures within both camps. we'll examine those divisions tonight and tomorrow night. jeffrey brown begins with israel's new government. brown: in jerusalem today, workers literally rolled out the red carpet as part of a final preparations ahead of president obama's trip to the region. at the same time, israel's new coalition government was itself installed. led again by prime minister benjamin netanyahu but including new key players. its formation took weeks of negotiations after netanyahu won re-election in january's parliamentary elections. a victory accompanied by the surprisingly strong second-place finish of yair lapid. today netanyahu had to say about his new government stance on relations with the palestinians. >> with a palestinian partner who is willing to conduct negotiations in good faith
in syria and will be a critical subject of conversation when president obama makes his first trip to israel as president and sits down with benjamin netanyahu. from the beginning the united states has had extremely good cooperation on the intelligence front from the israeli government. obviously, they are in the neighborhood, syria's neighbor to the south. they have a much better picture here, not only of the state of play with the assad regime and its stability. the sources say a few more months at best for assad, but also the movement of chemical weapons. that exchange of information is critical from the united states' standpoint. while israel was out ahead of the obama administration in saying assad must go, you have to understand it's a little jittery in israel at this moment because they look to the south and what happened in egypt, the rise of the muslim brotherhood, given all the uncertainty of who and what would succeed assad if he were to fall, wolf. important the president and prime minister stay on the same page on this one. >> what do they expect to emerge from president obama's
by a civil war in syria and a potential threat from iran. joining me is a former spokesman for the national security council in the obama administration and aaron david miller, fellow at the woodrow wilson international center. welcome, both. first, tommy, why did it take so long for this president to get to israel? he had a lot on his plate there were enormous economic challenges to deal with back home. but not every president going to israel in his first term, george bush didn't. this is great opportunity for the president to sync up with prime minister netanyahu on iran, sir yarks the critical issues of the region where israel is in the eye of the storm. he can also speak directly to the israeli people, via a speech to a bunch of university students. >> aaron david miller, you were a middle east negotiator in a number of white houses and state departments, republican and democratic. what, how much syncing up with prime minister netanyahu do you think is going to take place, realistically? >> it's smart politics, it's smart policy, too. obama has got the most dysfunctional relationship wi
's reinforcing a very strong relationship. we have to talk to israel about what's happening in syria, the iran situation. so on many fronts it's a useful, positive trip but no big break. >> especially when it comes to geopolitical relationships here's what president obama had to say last week on his radio tv with his relationship with bebe netanyahu. >> we've got a terrific relationship. he's very blunt with me on issues, and i'm very blunt with him about issues and we get stuff done. >> blunt? the trip is going to highlight talks with netanyahu. but the speech in jerusalem, more to be done with visiting with mahmoud abbas as well. could this be obama helping to set up secretary of state john kerry for what you talk about is the larger issue of peace negotiations down the line? >> yes, and i believe secretary kerry is very committed to a middle east peace process. i think it's long overdue. and i think the president's got to give him the political cover that secretary kerry would need. and key is going to be the israeli public. and the relationship with president netanyahu. you know you what s
, and which subjects are expected to dominate the president's agenda there? because, you know, we have syria, but there's also the ongoing anxiety about iran and a nuclear weapons. >> reporter: right. certainly a lot of ground to cover, martin. i think that one of president obama's goals will be to really send a strong message to prime minister benjamin netanyahu as well as the people of israel and other people in the region that he stands firmly with israel. as you know, the president and the prime minister have had a somewhat rocky relationship. so it's partially to smooth over that relationship. the president has taken some criticism, particularly during the last presidential campaign, that he wasn't a strong enough ally to israel. i think part of it will be to smooth over that perception. but i think you will see the president reiterate the fact the united states will do whatever is necessary to make sure that iran doesn't get a nuclear weapon. of course, that is a big concern for israel and will also sort of reiterate the united states will try to continue to isolate syria and to make s
targets at what he thought would satisfy obama. he didn't do it. they wanted the election to respond to the president of the united states. now he's doing what he probably should have done in the first term. >> very quickly, if syria -- when syria falls. i think everybody believes it's a when, not an if. does that make the peace process harder or easier? >> i think that -- that right now the reality is they're detached. i think that if syria continues to be a mess. let's ask ourselves what that means. it probably means that syria goes -- the problems go over border. if they begin to go into iraq. begin to go into turkey. begin to go into, of course, lebanon. as that begins to happen, to spill over through the region, i don't think it necessarily affects one way or another the palestinia palestinians. it raises the temperature in the entire region. that doesn't mean the effort will go into a palestine and israel deal. >> steve clemons. >> great to be with you. >>> quick live look. markets. dow finished in negative territory friday. very small. snapped a ten-day winning streak. guess w
. we're talking about afghanistan but how do you think history is going to judge the obama administration's decision not to intervene in any significant military fashion in syria? 70,000 dead as you know and several million refugees. >> i think it's way too early how to predict how history is going to judge whether our policy is right. it's not too early to know how history will judge assad. that's easy. but in terms of whether or not we have proceeded in a more deliberate way than some would want us to, and probably a little more than i would want us to if you want to get into that, nonetheless the goal here is to make sure that what happens after assad is, is stable, is diverse, is not chaotic. that the right people are the ones that take over when assad goes. and that's, that's a matter of putting in place, if possible, a kind of an interim political coalition, which will have broad support inside of syria, which will not see a long period of retribution and violence following the fall of assad which will happen. and putting that in place to the extent that's possible is
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8